Psalterium Sathanas

Discussion on literature other than by the Star of Azazel.
Frater Setesh
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Psalterium Sathanas

Postby Frater Setesh » Mon Dec 11, 2017 2:13 pm

I'm curious if anyone has ever read Psalterium Sathanas written by J. Boomsma and published by Aeon Sophia Press? Its described by the publisher as quote "a small book that contains 24 Devotional Verses dedicated to Lucifer-Satan." "It is a devotional work containing a series of hymns, prayers, and essay work for the purpose of contemplation and reflection upon the refractions of an ancient mystery. This work was written to offer a moment to remove oneself from the mundane and daily routine through a method of meditation and the recitation of mantras. By doing so, one seeks to acknowledge the individual and personal universe within. More so one takes the time to establish a desire and will towards spiritual growth and to concentrate on the spiritual bonds forming with the Master. The Psalterium Sathanas, worked with intention, shall serve as a guide and a spiritual tool for the cultivation of prayer as a practice of 'Bhakti-Yoga: Devotional Service'."

P.S. I own the book & I love it. It's in like my Top Five favorite works of occult literature after the works of Frater Johannes Nefastos.
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Heith
Sodalis
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Re: Psalterium Sathanas

Postby Heith » Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:34 pm

Not familiar with this publication, but I've seen pictures of it somewhere online.

But then again, as a thumb rule I don't find ritual instructions or formulae to be interesting or relevant for my own path so I don't pay much attention to what is being published. I seem to gain much more from art books, academically inclined texts or poetry. An exception might be very ancient texts, or from the more contemporary vein, the works of mr. John Dee, whom I am yet to dig into.

But mostly, works of art is my thing.
Frater Setesh
Posts: 23
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:22 pm

Re: Psalterium Sathanas

Postby Frater Setesh » Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:46 pm

Heith wrote:Not familiar with this publication, but I've seen pictures of it somewhere online.

But then again, as a thumb rule I don't find ritual instructions or formulae to be interesting or relevant for my own path so I don't pay much attention to what is being published. I seem to gain much more from art books, academically inclined texts or poetry. An exception might be very ancient texts, or from the more contemporary vein, the works of mr. John Dee, whom I am yet to dig into.

But mostly, works of art is my thing.
Oh you read or study art books or academically inclined poetry etc. that sounds very interesting. Yeah John Dee is good I have yet to dig into his work as well but I've heard of his work. Maybe one day when i'm done with all the books I have I'll read his works.
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Heith
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Re: Psalterium Sathanas

Postby Heith » Tue Dec 12, 2017 9:10 pm

Frater Setesh wrote: Oh you read or study art books or academically inclined poetry etc. that sounds very interesting. Yeah John Dee is good I have yet to dig into his work as well but I've heard of his work. Maybe one day when i'm done with all the books I have I'll read his works.
Yes. The reason for this is that I am an artist by profession, so my interest is both personal and professional -where the two can (or if they can) be considered separate. I believe that we can learn much by studying the great minds of various fields, and my temperament is such that reading images is most natural and appealing to me. All great artists are esoterists by nature; they have all realised and made something into the material world which was before this unheard of, unthought of, perhaps not even dreamt. The great Rembrandt, for example, was called a magician for a reason. The way he paints shadow is incredibly moving; or how his works are at the same time worldly and holy, or humorous, completely spell binding.

Or how about Vincent van Gogh, whose paintings are positively bursting with emotion, with human suffering; feverish, searching, showing nightmarish roads or tangles of roots which lead to nowhere: these are powerful keys to reflecting the suffering of man. All great art is mystical by nature, and expresses formless things which are difficult, if impossible, to express via words. All great artists are something like intermediating priests, working to reveal god to those who can not imagine god.

If we think of the difference between seeing a dream, and writing of a dream, this comes close to what I'm driving at: an image which in a dream can express the utmost terror, for example, in writing becomes often very flat unless the author is very good (like Kafka). And that is how I feel about art; it shows me the dream, like I would be inside the dream, not simply reading about it.

About mr. Dee, I'm not entirely sure I've the capacity to understand him. But he was a product of an era which fascinates me, historically.

Well I went off topic. Sorry about that.
Frater Setesh
Posts: 23
Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:22 pm

Re: Psalterium Sathanas

Postby Frater Setesh » Tue Dec 12, 2017 9:21 pm

Heith wrote:
Frater Setesh wrote: Oh you read or study art books or academically inclined poetry etc. that sounds very interesting. Yeah John Dee is good I have yet to dig into his work as well but I've heard of his work. Maybe one day when i'm done with all the books I have I'll read his works.
Yes. The reason for this is that I am an artist by profession, so my interest is both personal and professional -where the two can (or if they can) be considered separate. I believe that we can learn much by studying the great minds of various fields, and my temperament is such that reading images is most natural and appealing to me. All great artists are esoterists by nature; they have all realised and made something into the material world which was before this unheard of, unthought of, perhaps not even dreamt. The great Rembrandt, for example, was called a magician for a reason. The way he paints shadow is incredibly moving; or how his works are at the same time worldly and holy, or humorous, completely spell binding.

Or how about Vincent van Gogh, whose paintings are positively bursting with emotion, with human suffering; feverish, searching, showing nightmarish roads or tangles of roots which lead to nowhere: these are powerful keys to reflecting the suffering of man. All great art is mystical by nature, and expresses formless things which are difficult, if impossible, to express via words. All great artists are something like intermediating priests, working to reveal god to those who can not imagine god.

If we think of the difference between seeing a dream, and writing of a dream, this comes close to what I'm driving at: an image which in a dream can express the utmost terror, for example, in writing becomes often very flat unless the author is very good (like Kafka). And that is how I feel about art; it shows me the dream, like I would be inside the dream, not simply reading about it.

About mr. Dee, I'm not entirely sure I've the capacity to understand him. But he was a product of an era which fascinates me, historically.

Well I went off topic. Sorry about that.
Oh okay I understand what you mean very interesting point of view.

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