Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Questions directed to the Star of Azazel.
Fomalhaut
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Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Fomalhaut » Mon Dec 02, 2013 11:30 pm

If you are reading the Bible, which versions of it do you read? Which verses are most influential in your Work?
"I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become."
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Heith
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Heith » Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:21 am

I don't read the bible, but I would like to do so at some point. I have been pondering which version is preferable, so this is a interesting topic.

But probably I am unable to abandon the norse text sources for the next ten years or so, and this bible-project will never occur ;)
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Nefastos » Tue Dec 03, 2013 12:10 pm

So far I've been using the King James version. If need would arise to make a more detailed or academic studies, that alone might not be sufficient.

Of the Finnish Bibles I understandably read more, I use the older version of 1933/1938 & not the newest, which is neither beautiful in language nor exact in form, but reflects only the Lutheran need to make things sound everyday & common.
Faust: "Lo contempla. / Ei muove in tortuosa spire / e s'avvicina lento alla nostra volta. / Oh! se non erro, / orme di foco imprime al suol!"
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Jiva
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Jiva » Tue Dec 10, 2013 1:38 am

I have a copy of the English Standard Version on my Kindle. I went to a Church of England primary school so I assume I read either this edition, the King James or something similar when I was a child. I actually find this version really dull too, but as it's electronic and indexed well it's easy to search for key passages.

I know almost nothing about how the Bible is translated and the intricacies involved. It always struck me that this should have been more of an issue for Islam, but I've never investigated the issue.
'Oh Krishna, restless and overpowering, this mind is overwhelmingly strong; I think we might as easily gain control over the wind as over this.'
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Frater Setesh » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:52 am

I have a version of the Bible that’s called Today’s New International Version
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Heith
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Heith » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:57 am

I find king James version to be the most captivating, language wise, so that is the one which I read when I do these days.
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Frater Setesh » Fri Jan 19, 2018 12:01 pm

Heith wrote:I find king James version to be the most captivating, language wise, so that is the one which I read when I do these days.
Oh ok nice! I’ve read the King James Version and had one when I was younger. I should look into getting a copy.
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Heith » Fri Jan 19, 2018 12:15 pm

Frater Setesh wrote:
Heith wrote:I find king James version to be the most captivating, language wise, so that is the one which I read when I do these days.
Oh ok nice! I’ve read the King James Version and had one when I was younger. I should look into getting a copy.
There's some websites which compare different versions, so you can see what language feels nicest for you personally.
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby obnoxion » Fri Jan 19, 2018 2:15 pm

King James Bible is like a book of poetry, and a treasure house of poetic themes and images. But I always use Hebrew and Greek originals also. It is useless to try to make an accurate translation, so it is more important to make a poetic one. A real poetic translation is always somewhat inspired, and it coneys a sense of holiness.

There are many finw interlinear editions of the two Testaments. And The Strong's latest concordance is the best dictionary, I think, for both Greek and Hebrew.

I would also recommend reading the Quoran, because it is also a brilliant book of poetry, and in a sense it is like a "third testament" as the themes of the Bible continue therein.
One day of Brahma has 14 Indras; his life has 54 000 Indras. One day of Vishnu is the lifetime of Brahma. The lifetime of Vishnu is one day of Shiva.
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Jiva
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Re: Which version(s) of Bible do you read?

Postby Jiva » Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:47 pm

obnoxion wrote:King James Bible is like a book of poetry, and a treasure house of poetic themes and images. But I always use Hebrew and Greek originals also. It is useless to try to make an accurate translation, so it is more important to make a poetic one. A real poetic translation is always somewhat inspired, and it coneys a sense of holiness.
I wondered if you - or anyone here - had ever read the Douay-Rheims translation? Many people who I've talked to consider it to be superior to the King James because of the more specialised terminology utilised, although I suppose this could easily remove the poetic sensibilities you mention.

I wouldn't say it's entirely useless to try to make an accurate translation. For example, I'm looking forward to reading David Bentley Hart's new translation of the New Testament, which he describes as "subversively literal" - by which he apparently means undermining many of the common assumptions academics and religious figures have regarding Paul. (A short article by Hart on the subject.)

In any case, I'm currently reading the Dutch Herziene Statenvertaling, a revision from the 2000s of an original state translation from 1637. I've never actually read the Bible from cover to cover, so I thought I'd finally get round to it. No ideas on the veracity of the translation or anything like that - I assume Hart would be unhappy as it was supervised by a committee of academics and religious figures - but almost every verse has a commentary in a footnote and links to other verses when applicable. There are also genealogies of basically everyone mentioned, as well as illustrations of e.g. the various temples constructed, which is incredibly useful considering how the Bible typically resorts to listing these things in a basically impenetrable manner.
'Oh Krishna, restless and overpowering, this mind is overwhelmingly strong; I think we might as easily gain control over the wind as over this.'

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