Horror Fiction

Discussion on literature other than by the Star of Azazel.
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Sebomai
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Re: Horror Fiction

Postby Sebomai » Mon Feb 10, 2014 4:46 pm

Fra. Benemal, agree and agree. Dan Simmons is a very gifted writer, and especially Song of Kali is one of the most deeply unsettling horror novels I've read in my life. And I have not read an awful lot of Clark Ashton Smith, but what I have read is beautifully written and its effects are just as you described them. Quite trippy indeed. Brings your mind to places people usually need recreational chemical stimulation to find.
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wayfareangel
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Re: Horror Fiction

Postby wayfareangel » Tue Feb 11, 2014 11:50 am

Secured some audiobooks of Dan Simmons work, and looking into Clark Ashton Smith. Gods, do I ever love the recommendations that come out of this thread.
Time for one more daring dream.
Circaeon

Re: Horror Fiction

Postby Circaeon » Wed Jan 11, 2017 2:18 pm

I would recommend British author Dennis Wheatley's occult books, which contain both astral travel, theistic satanism, ceremonial magic and a line of references to ancient eastern spiritual practice as well as to traditional sabbatic witchcraft and western esotericism. Two of his books has actually been adapted unto the screen with Christopher Lee as main character - as a villain / satanic cult leader and excommunicated priest in To the Devil a Daughter and as the hero / Doctor Philosophiae of occult studies in The Devil Rides Out. Both excellent movies, in my opinion (the invoked - materialized - Baphomet looks awesome in the latter).

Note that Christopher Lee's character has been slightly changed in the movie adaption of The Devil Rides Out. While he is an expert in astral travel and psych-eccentric defense + a powerful magician - aside from being a respected Doctor Philosophiae in his social life - in the books, he is merely a professor / academical expert in occultism in the movie (whom has also dabbled within dark magic in his youth).
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Nefastos
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Re: Horror Fiction

Postby Nefastos » Wed Jan 11, 2017 3:18 pm

Circaeon wrote:I would recommend British author Dennis Wheatley's occult books


Since it seems to be my book criticism week, here is my opinion about Wheatley... :)

Since I just got to my hands the same version I originally read from the library long ago, I am currently reading once more The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, which is my personal favourite of Lovecraft's own books. Even though I, heretically, like August Derleth's Lovecraft-ripped The Lurker at the Threshold equally.
Faust: "Lo contempla. / Ei muove in tortuosa spire / e s'avvicina lento alla nostra volta. / Oh! se non erro, / orme di foco imprime al suol!"
Circaeon

Re: Horror Fiction

Postby Circaeon » Wed Jan 11, 2017 3:51 pm

[quote="Nefastos"]Since it seems to be my book criticism week, here is my opinion about Wheatley... :)

Since I just got to my hands the same version I originally read from the library long ago, I am currently reading once more The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, which is my personal favourite of Lovecraft's own books. Even though I, heretically, like August Derleth's Lovecraft-ripped The Lurker at the Threshold equally.
[/quote]


Haha, well, I never did ascribe him any particular greatness. =) While I do like the books, I cannot deny the fact that they are basically 1930's pulp fiction. Excellent when you are bored and in the mood for some easily read fiction with occult themes.

I believe Derleth's The Lurker at the Threshold was an official pastiche, based upon some notes by Lovecraft himself. I seem to recall - from some article on Derleth vs Lovecraft - that this particular novel was published as a posthumous collaboration between the two authors. It's a nice novel and I do believe that Derleth was one of few individuals worthy to pastischize Lovecraft.

Has anyone BTW mentioned Blackwood or Ewers yet?
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RaktaZoci
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Re: Horror Fiction

Postby RaktaZoci » Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:30 pm

Nefastos wrote:
Circaeon wrote:I would recommend British author Dennis Wheatley's occult books

Since it seems to be my book criticism week, here is my opinion about Wheatley... :)
Since Wheatley was brought up I have to say that I purchased his book "The Satanist" not so long ago, but haven't had the time to read it yet. Now I am almost tempted!! ;)
die Eule der Minerva beginnt erst mit der einbrechenden Dämmerung ihren Flug.
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Jiva
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Re: Horror Fiction

Postby Jiva » Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:40 pm

Well, this could go in either thread, but has anyone else read any Arthur Machen? Personally, I've only read The Great God Pan which is very short - it can easily be read in one go - but I found it quite intoxicating. You can see that Lovecraft was clearly influenced by it. The basic premise is a scientist trying to gain greater knowledge and inadvertently unleashing an occult force, which basically summarises at least half of Lovecraft's work.
'Oh Krishna, restless and overpowering, this mind is overwhelmingly strong; I think we might as easily gain control over the wind as over this.'
Circaeon

Re: Horror Fiction

Postby Circaeon » Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:10 pm

[quote="Jiva"]Well, this could go in either thread, but has anyone else read any Arthur Machen? Personally, I've only read The Great God Pan which is very short - it can easily be read in one go - but I found it quite intoxicating. You can see that Lovecraft was clearly influenced by it. The basic premise is a scientist trying to gain greater knowledge and inadvertently unleashing an occult force, which basically summarises at least half of Lovecraft's work.[/quote]

Of course! I love Arthur Machen and consider him to be one of my favourite authors within horror literature, next to Gustaf Meyrink, Hanns Heinz Ewers, Algernon Blackwood, Howard Phillips Lovecraft and Edgar Allan Poe.

I can also recommend Robert W. Chambers, Ambrose Bierce and Matthew Lewis' innovative novel The Monk from 1796.
Circaeon

Re: Horror Fiction

Postby Circaeon » Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:11 pm

Circaeon wrote:[quote="Jiva"]Well, this could go in either thread, but has anyone else read any Arthur Machen? Personally, I've only read The Great God Pan which is very short - it can easily be read in one go - but I found it quite intoxicating. You can see that Lovecraft was clearly influenced by it. The basic premise is a scientist trying to gain greater knowledge and inadvertently unleashing an occult force, which basically summarises at least half of Lovecraft's work.
Of course! I love Arthur Machen and consider him to be one of my favourite authors within horror literature, next to Gustaf Meyrink, Hanns Heinz Ewers, Algernon Blackwood, Howard Phillips Lovecraft and Edgar Allan Poe.

I can also recommend Robert W. Chambers, Paul Leppin, Ambrose Bierce and Matthew Lewis' innovative novel The Monk from 1796.[/size][/quote]
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Jiva
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Re: Horror Fiction

Postby Jiva » Sun Jan 15, 2017 6:01 pm

Circaeon wrote:I can also recommend... Matthew Lewis' innovative novel The Monk from 1796.
Ah yes, this is on my wants list. I recently watched the French film starring Vincent Cassel, which I thought was OK, but I'm guessing they streamlined the book quite significantly (although I could be wrong, of course).
'Oh Krishna, restless and overpowering, this mind is overwhelmingly strong; I think we might as easily gain control over the wind as over this.'

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