Jung, The Red Book

Discussion on literature other than by the Star of Azazel.
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Wyrmfang
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Re: Jung, The Red Book

Post by Wyrmfang »

Yeah, sorry. Will post it tomorrow. I had scheduling problems and then forgot to mention it.
Wyrmfang
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Re: Jung, The Red Book

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The Gift of Magic

The conversation with the soul continues. The soul asks Jung to listen carefully if he can hear anything. A slight ringing to left ear can be heard and a black magic rod appears as an offering. If it is accepted it demands the sacrifice of solace but gives the magic - something which Jung has no idea whatsoever what it could be and what use it has. Still he finally accepts the rods and gives up solace.

The rest of the chapter stresses the extremely lonely nature of continuing on one´s own path and no one else´s. The magic rod is some kind of solidification of this loneliness and entirely implicit knowledge, "the first thing darkness offers". A kind of leap of faith is demanded: there is something in darkness that feels necessary to know but of which there is no positive knowledge and no tangible promises of such. After a lengthy more poetical part (in which there is a lot of primitive alchemical symbols such as healing potions) the chapter ends with this rather bleak passage:
The inexplicable occurs. You would very much like to forsake yourself and defect to each and every manifold possibility. You would very much like to risk every crime in order to steal for yourself the mystery of the changeful. But the road is without end.
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Astraya
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Re: Jung, The Red Book

Post by Astraya »

My comments will be late at this month, got a nasty flu just after moving to a new place, so schedules are disorder here as well, sorry.
“There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion”
― Carl Gustav Jung
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Astraya
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Re: Jung, The Red Book

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The Way of the Cross

I found it very difficult to grasp in this particular chapter, perhaps the visions which it gave shouldn’t be opened too much at the moment, by me, for some reason. When I read, I often get the feeling that some words hold within themselves knowledge, which will open up later in life.

Chapter speaks about Christ’s sacrifice and the importance of ones life to continue this sacrifice. Serpent, who wounds itself on the wooden cross, is a man inside the spiritual and ethical trials and gets transformed by going through the dead body, the flesh of Christ. After this, coronation can happen, which indicates the higher understanding of a sacrifice.
Strong and intense words are been used in the chapter, when the ones connection in ones own life is been described. Repulsion and disgust, which are often present when one looks closely inside to the personal and collective suffering. “How much blood must go on flowing until man opens his eyes and sees the way to his own path and himself as the enemy.” When such repulsion appears, it is a vivid and important step towards higher compassion, but a step, where one cannot linger, for just to knowledge this suffering is the Serpent. It can wound itself endlessly on the wood, but without the Christ’s flesh, the part of actual Christ, this knowledge leads to sorrow and coldness and one cannot become the Serpent with a Crown.

The sacrifice of Christ and the different way to continue it by a man is important. Christ, who has gone through initiations can make it visible (visible by many different angles, one being historical and other symbolical and so on…) to everyone, for a man who sees the inevitability in sacrifice, can make the offer to god. This is a sacrifice, which is made in solitude and humbleness. To offer ones own flesh to god, like Christ offered his to everyone. This is a continuing mortification which actually is vivid work, to make oneself a sacrifice and being able to give up ones own life.

Later the chapter speaks about the man having not a part by making the future, but actually making it. Duality in the Red Book, and overall in occult texts and teachings is common and difficult for me to understand. It is like the world of a man is a constant struggle between the different ways to express the Truths.
“There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion”
― Carl Gustav Jung
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