Reading Circle (Jung: Psychology and Alchemy)

Discussion on literature other than by the Star of Azazel.
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Smaragd
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Re: Reading Circle (Jung: Psychology and Alchemy)

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Nefastos wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 8:26 am
e. "Aurora consurgens" and the Doctrine of Sapientia
The alchemical-astrological notions of the Sun and the Moon in this part are very well explaining basic ideas to make more sense of following moon cycles and the annual cycles tying up the quadrant ideas of the elements/seasons/image of self from the mandala chapter. These are almost as vibrantly striking to me as the notion presented by Zosimos of the divine man being lured in to the elemental suit. A mental image that just makes so much sense to me.

More over the masculine feminine sides of Mercury was very interesting and something I just happened to be thinking with focus earlier the day of reading this subchapter. Sapientia as divine female sounded alot like Venus. And yet Jung seems point the masculine and feminine sides of Mercury to be here that of Sun and the Moon, which also makes sense. This inspires me to further study the seven spirits within each other, how do they align to make a whole that makes sense to me.
Nefastos wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 8:26 am
The whole section is a bit chaotic, which is not a bad thing per se, but instead of one red thread, one is likely to receive many sparks of fragmentary insights.
I was kind of sensing the red thread somewhere in those gender polarities of Mercury: the dynamism between the water/sea and desert/fire and their respected alchemical phases connecting to the androgynous nature of the lapis and Christ. But it seemed to be only implied as the author didn’t come to completely meet the red thread in the end, yet it made following it all the more fascinating ecspecially so when I’ve been thinking about the same themes on my own lately. The connection of the mother and the son we discussed some time ago on another topic in the Finnish side, but there’s some other feminine aspect I’m really interested researching. I can’t quite point it so I might have to leave it to be written more about later.
Nefastos wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 8:26 am
One eager to study Fohat's whirlwind might find some useful tidbits from information from pages 386-387. "When therefore Abu'l Qâsim speaks of the fire as the "great south wind," he is in agreement with the ancient Greek view that Hermes was a wind-god."
Uh, there's so much things here that has been very central to my study lately yet it's hard to put them in to a clear picture of the whole. These winds from the cardinal directions first of all connect to the rota of the great wheel, which seems to be one with the idea in Book of Dzyan: the Fohat striking (the lightning of Eros) in the fiery whirwinds. Then in the footnote regarding Phanes, you kindly noted on the Red Book reading circle:
Red Book p. 359 wrote:The jug made of stone, the vessel of completion, Water flowed in, wine flowed in, milk flowed in, blood flowed in. / The fours Winds Precipitated into the precious vessel. / The Gods of the four Heavenly Realms hold its curvature, the two Mothers and the two Fathers guard it, the fire of the North Burns above its mouth, the serpent of the South encircles its bottom, the spirit of the East holds one of its sides and the spirit of the West the other./ Forever denied it exists forever. Recurring in all forms, forever the same, this one precious vessel, surrounded by the Circle of animals, denying itself, and arising in a new Splendor through its self-denial.
The two Mothers and the two Fathers guarding the jug made of stone remind me of the image pointed again in this subchapter where there's a man and a woman forming a cross, but as they are bend in 90 degree angles one of each are enough to image the masculine-feminine polarities of the two poles of the cross. Another very interesting and clarifying notion on this same theme can be seen in a painting by D.G. Rossetti, named Lady Lilith. I've been writing an article on this, but might as well contribute with the thoughts here as the themes are coming together here. There's two candles behind Lilith right next to a mirror, making all and all two pairs. The mirror image opens up to a lush world of spring very much in the sense that is described in the Phanes footnote (those parts I left out from the quote above), while it would be expected that the mirror image would mirror the confined, separate and dark surroundings Lilith occupies. The candles are mirrored but they are extinguished, there's no fire that would pass through the fire from the world beyond to this demonic existence of Lilith. So the beauty of Lilith is something similar to Narcissus' beauty, confined in a nihilistic existence not reaching the greater whole through the mirror behind her. The two Mothers and the two Fathers - the four Guardians ask for work to be done to allow it. And the work, according to Jung seems to be that of dividing the one element in to four to make them equal and balanced, and to know them to be able to work with them, thus granting oneself access through the Guards and become them, employ or serve them.

Image

I wonder if these four winds, four liquids - the quadral elements have their numeral root in the four Kumaras, are Kumaras the Guardians and the mouths who blow the four winds? This is something of a confusion I've been stuck in lately. Some times when doing the Om Mani Padme Hum mantra, I've intuitively thought in the 'Mani' part these guardians in the sun-cross/the great wheel to be Kumaras.
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Re: Reading Circle (Jung: Psychology and Alchemy)

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Nefastos wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 8:26 am
One eager to study Fohat's whirlwind might find some useful tidbits from information from pages 386-387. "When therefore Abu'l Qâsim speaks of the fire as the "great south wind," he is in agreement with the ancient Greek view that Hermes was a wind-god."
Smaragd wrote: Sun Feb 21, 2021 11:46 pm Uh, there's so much things here that has been very central to my study lately yet it's hard to put them in to a clear picture of the whole. These winds from the cardinal directions first of all connect to the rota of the great wheel, which seems to be one with the idea in Book of Dzyan: the Fohat striking (the lightning of Eros) in the fiery whirwinds.
It has been speculated also that Ódhinn is originally a wind and storm god, and he has also very much in common with Hermes as a psychopomp. I'm quite certain that Ódhinn is the same as Hermes in his germanic guise, and I also believe that proto-Ódhinn and Shiva are one and the same figure.
Wealth is a comfort to all; yet everyone must bestow it freely, if they wish to gain honor in the sight of the Lord.
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Re: Reading Circle (Jung: Psychology and Alchemy)

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Rúnatýr wrote: Mon Feb 22, 2021 4:53 pmIt has been speculated also that Ódhinn is originally a wind and storm god, and he has also very much in common with Hermes as a psychopomp.

This is the stance in Blavatsky's Esoteric Instructions, where Odin-Wotan is given as the direct correspondence of Mercury:


Esoteric Instruction diagram 2.jpg
Esoteric Instruction diagram 2.jpg (318.64 KiB) Viewed 480 times

Serpens mercurii is the kundalinî which is buddhi in its magnetically activated state" (as opposed to its usual latent functioning in the uninitiated i.e. the un-loving). The polar pair of Saturn-Mercury, our traditional Black aspect pairing, is the magical agency through which the inner process of transmutation is accomplished. "Four winds" are the four winds of the Sun (Swastika), forming the similar L shapes that is found from the polar cross of the sexes above. "Vital winds" go through the etheric human being & correspond to the four elements in White astral. The juggler keeping everything in motion is the Mercurial trickster, Iocator, who pushes through the obstacles by uniting the opposites.
Faust: "Lo contempla. / Ei muove in tortuosa spire / e s'avvicina lento alla nostra volta. / Oh! se non erro, / orme di foco imprime al suol!"
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Re: Reading Circle (Jung: Psychology and Alchemy)

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I had forgotten that diagram completely. The week in old norse-germanic society was 5 days long, so they didn't have special divinities for the Sun and the Moon which is also clear from the diagram where all the other days of the week are given their Norse counterparts also but lack the Norse archetypes for the Sun and the Moon. I have pondered a lot this thing and in my own "romanized system" I have added the Sun and the Moon into the septenary correspondences.
Wealth is a comfort to all; yet everyone must bestow it freely, if they wish to gain honor in the sight of the Lord.
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Re: Reading Circle (Jung: Psychology and Alchemy)

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Rúnatýr wrote: Mon Feb 22, 2021 6:27 pmthe diagram where all the other days of the week are given their Norse counterparts also but lack the Norse archetypes for the Sun and the Moon.

It lacks the Scandinavian deity for Saturday though. To whom is that day dedicated traditionally?

Blavatsky's intention was obviously to remind of the etymological basis:

SUN-day
MO[O]N-day
TIW'S-day
WODEN'S-day
THUR'S-day
FRI[GE]-day
SATUR[N]-day

Rúnatýr wrote: Mon Feb 22, 2021 6:27 pmI had forgotten that diagram completely.

For me, it's the most important one. The SoA members may notice that it's the source for many of our central practices & approaches.
Faust: "Lo contempla. / Ei muove in tortuosa spire / e s'avvicina lento alla nostra volta. / Oh! se non erro, / orme di foco imprime al suol!"
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Re: Reading Circle (Jung: Psychology and Alchemy)

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Nefastos wrote: Tue Feb 23, 2021 7:36 am
Rúnatýr wrote: Mon Feb 22, 2021 6:27 pmthe diagram where all the other days of the week are given their Norse counterparts also but lack the Norse archetypes for the Sun and the Moon.

It lacks the Scandinavian deity for Saturday though. To whom is that day dedicated traditionally?
That is also uncertain since there's no written records from the past. Since I find Ódhinn to represent both Mercury (Christos) and Saturn (Satan) I have dedicated it primarily to Ódhinn, but it can be seen as Loki's day also; and Ódhinn / Loki are certainly connected. Traditionally in Scandia it was named "Laugardagr" (roughly "washing day") which hints to Loki. It has been a little difficult to apply Roman deities to Norse-Germanic ones because of the different calendar system they used but for many reasons I have found it best to follow the septenary. In my hymns I give in Saturdays honors to Ódhinn, Loki and Hel.
Wealth is a comfort to all; yet everyone must bestow it freely, if they wish to gain honor in the sight of the Lord.
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