Gardening

Putting together ones life with the modern world.
User avatar
Heith
Sodalis
Posts: 2509
Joined: Fri May 31, 2013 12:54 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Heith » Mon Apr 18, 2016 11:25 am

To continue, as I had to quit before composing, my entire reply last time, why not try to grow sage? It should be quite an easy one.

When burnt, it gives a heavy, slightly greasy smoke which I find to be quite calming. Sage is often used for smudging, so it has a purifying effect. You can also just drop a few leaves on a candle flame if you live in a flat. Another option is to dry them in a tight bundle which you can light and burn for as long as you need. The smell of sage is to some noses slightly marihuana-ish, so neighbours might wonder what you're up to!
Otava
Frater
Posts: 168
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:26 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Otava » Mon May 09, 2016 12:53 pm

Sorry that I haven't even introduced myself yet, but I have to yell something to this topic first.

I really got into gardening about six years ago when we moved into townhouse and there was a backyard. Started with few chiles, then some herbs, zucchinis, tomatoes and then it got out of hands... Luckily I have now even bigger backyard.

At those times it really wasn't much more than just an urge to feed my inner child (still is!) and be amazed every time that I was able to grow something. But it has become much more. Gardening is esoteric practise, and it is magic to me! To be able to grow your own food? Not completely, but still. How great is that? And last but definitely not least: it helps me keep the distance to the modern world. Light breeze of asceticism helps you focus.
Heith wrote:The art of Bonsai (or, as Fra Teratokrios so aptly puts, the BDSM of the gardening world)
Oh no!
Heith wrote:As you are a Finn, hyötykasviyhdistys is a good option.
Recommended.
Heith wrote:Even small spaces can be surprisingly effective when one arranges them properly.
Absolutely true!

I've just started a project which is going to take couple of years: started growing asparagus from the seeds.

When I joined SoA three months ago I accidentally found a seeds of Passiflora incarnata (Kristuksen kärsimyskukka). I had to buy them.
User avatar
Heith
Sodalis
Posts: 2509
Joined: Fri May 31, 2013 12:54 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Heith » Fri Apr 07, 2017 8:47 am

Now that spring is coming fast, and I no longer have the opportunity to garden, I'd like to live through you a little. What grows in your garden this summer?
User avatar
Mimesis
Frater
Posts: 351
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2014 12:32 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Mimesis » Tue Jun 20, 2017 3:22 am

Gardening has very recently become something of great interest to me, and is an endeavour that I consider to be very esoteric in nature; at least potentially so.

That said, my engagement with it to date I think would be more rightly considered 'cleaning or clearing', rather than gardening per se, but the essence of it has touched me.

I have relatively recently (being a couple of months) moved where I am living from one situation to a new one. There is a shared garden in the place that I have moved to, which I found upon moving to be in a state that I cannot adequately express in word. The whole thing was smothered in what must have been a two foot sea of old plastic, rubber, broken glass, rotting wood from discarded furniture, cans and all manner of things which had just been dumped and in turn covered in weed, twigs, soil, leaves and cut branches.

Having spent a few weeks seeing and scowling at the state of it, I decided that I would actively try to do something about it by clearing it. Over the last few weeks, I have dedicated what time I have been able to, to clearing and cleaning the state that the garden was in. A few weeks on, many mounds and bags of rubbish/recycling and numerous journeys to the tip and recycling centre later, and I now find myself with a garden that is clean and clear of the rubbish that I found it in, and in some what of a state similar to a blank canvas.

Whilst I appreciate that this is not really gardening in a growing, planting and landscaping sense, I can see how I have mentally mirrored the process of this physical effort to clear a space of cluttered mess, and I have found meaningful fulfillment in it. The process of physically clearing all this manifold waste and clutter provided a very direct and singular focus, which in turn allowed for a deeper look at the mental clutter that filled the body trying to clear the physical one in front of me. On many levels, this happened subconsciously.
It allowed a relatable activity and a space within which to deconstruct mental clutter, and just like the cleaning of the garden, gave a structured and singular process of accepting the mess, deciding to face it, preparing how to do so, collecting and then separating all of the different kinds of waste and deciding what of it can be recycled and where as well as what of it is fit only to be tipped and then taking all of these decompartmentalised piles of accepted waste and disposing of each individually as appropriate.

I think there something very esoteric in the nature of this, and this no doubt continues with the process of then looking to plan and plant things for growth.

I cannot help but make a nod to the following relatable article, written by sister Heith, which is published both on the public blog as well as within the second Unseen Fire; Flora, Fauna and Terra, in case it remains unknown to anyone. I have always found it fantastically interesting, but find great joy and meaning in returning to it now.

http://www.azazel.fi/lucifer/2015/05/on ... gardening/
"We are such stuff. As dreams are made on, and our little life. Is rounded with a sleep."
User avatar
Heith
Sodalis
Posts: 2509
Joined: Fri May 31, 2013 12:54 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Heith » Tue Jun 20, 2017 9:18 am

Omoksha wrote:Gardening has very recently become something of great interest to me, and is an endeavour that I consider to be very esoteric in nature; at least potentially so.

That said, my engagement with it to date I think would be more rightly considered 'cleaning or clearing', rather than gardening per se, but the essence of it has touched me.
People often have the misconception that gardening is just about planting stuff and pulling out weeds. The majority of the work is however heavy lifting and carrying stuff around. The structures that one doesn't even really see take the most time and effort.


Omoksha wrote:Having spent a few weeks seeing and scowling at the state of it, I decided that I would actively try to do something about it by clearing it.
And for this, I applaud you. People too often have a tendency to "freeze" into a state of disapproval but they sort of seem to think that to do something about the problem at hand is either not worth doing (like in this case, you don't own the property so "why bother") OR that they believe it's someone else's responsibility ("well I didn't dump all that shit there").

Having received some photo reports of your garden clearing project, I have to say that I am extremely impressed with how fast you managed to do this, and also, that you actually recycled everything instead of just dumping it all in a cluster. So you have not only improved your living space, but taken care of nature in the process.
Omoksha wrote:I think there something very esoteric in the nature of this, and this no doubt continues with the process of then looking to plan and plant things for growth.
Precisely. Now that your garden "canvas" is cleared, the work gets in a way more poetic and subtle. One has to consider many things; how the soil is like, how does the sun move here. What kind of colours do I like, what kind of colours work together, how do I make something which is enjoyable through the seasons, not only on high summer? You may even ponder the esoteric qualities of the flowers, victorian era flower meanings or, to decide to go for example only native plants. After that animals come into play: butterflies, bees, birds. A lively garden is a lovely garden. Whichever you decide, please do a small amount of research so that you do not plant invasive species.
Omoksha wrote:I cannot help but make a nod to the following relatable article, written by sister Heith, which is published both on the public blog as well as within the second Unseen Fire; Flora, Fauna and Terra, in case it remains unknown to anyone. I have always found it fantastically interesting, but find great joy and meaning in returning to it now.

http://www.azazel.fi/lucifer/2015/05/on ... gardening/
Thank you kindly.

I think that if ever a mortal heard the voice of God it would be in a garden at the cool of the day.
F. Frankfort Moore
User avatar
Mimesis
Frater
Posts: 351
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2014 12:32 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Mimesis » Tue Jun 20, 2017 4:12 pm

Heith wrote: And for this, I applaud you. People too often have a tendency to "freeze" into a state of disapproval but they sort of seem to think that to do something about the problem at hand is either not worth doing (like in this case, you don't own the property so "why bother") OR that they believe it's someone else's responsibility ("well I didn't dump all that shit there").

Having received some photo reports of your garden clearing project, I have to say that I am extremely impressed with how fast you managed to do this, and also, that you actually recycled everything instead of just dumping it all in a cluster. So you have not only improved your living space, but taken care of nature in the process.
Thank you sincerely, dear sister. It has turned into quite a joy, and an unexpected one, if I am entirely honest, so I don’t feel like I am due any applause, but rather that I must be -for which I am - very grateful for the opportunity to learn from it.

Perhaps the tendency for many to disapprove of something but not take the responsibility to do anything about it has to do with the reluctance to face and accept certain parts of oneself, or to accept a greater responsibility toward nature as an inescapable part of the greater whole that we call ‘humanity’. Instead, one persons individual cause is only ever seen as their own individual effect, when in reality this isn’t and can’t be the case.
It is almost like many feel a sense of entitlement or debt is owed to them if they set themselves toward rectifying or addressing something that may not be directly their responsibility.

This gardening project has become the antithesis of that. In beginning it, I accepted responsibility for working on something that is neither my direct responsibility or cause, but the internal gifts that I have been given as a result of the process are both beautiful and meaningful. And esoterically speaking, so too is the dismantling of clutter mentally that the physical process has allowed the mirror of.
Furthermore, on a shallow level, I now have a workable environment within which to grow, and a comfortable environment within which to spend time; both of which also allow for the esoteric mirror to these seemingly physical and shallow pursuits.

Heith wrote: Whichever you decide, please do a small amount of research so that you do not plant invasive species.
I certainly shall. I will also continue to draw upon your knowledge and greatly valued advice : )
"We are such stuff. As dreams are made on, and our little life. Is rounded with a sleep."
User avatar
Thelithiz
Posts: 171
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2016 10:04 am

Re: Gardening

Postby Thelithiz » Thu Jul 20, 2017 2:10 pm

I have almost always planted plants, in pots and when possible, outside. Formerly they flourished anywhere, but few last years have been strange: everything dies or doesn't even sprout, whatever I do. Same happens to my mother, in every house we have lived lately. Well, summers have been dark and cold, but it started before that. Planting, growing and all vegetation have been a self-evidece for me, though bringing worries.

I have experienced gardening mostly meditative, and the plants and flowers brings me great joy. As it's best I feel connected to living earth and everything through that. And yes, abandoned gardens really have they own atmosphere.

Still I often think is it right to raise others and weed away others; how can I know whether I have right to decide who lives? And same thing with every doings; is this RIGHT what I do. Maybe it would not happen if it wasn't...

I agree with the invasive species. Still, most plants in our nature have came here from far away. That happens everywhere, moving birds and others spread seeds, and the climate changes very quickly.
Otava
Frater
Posts: 168
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:26 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Otava » Fri Jul 21, 2017 8:29 pm

Heith wrote:Now that spring is coming fast, and I no longer have the opportunity to garden, I'd like to live through you a little. What grows in your garden this summer?
Sorry for not noticing this until now. This summer has been not so great but well, ok... I also burned some of the plants: gave them too much sun too quickly. I did plant some of them again, but its going to be too late.

Two different tomatoes, lots of chilis, watermelon, paprikas, cape gooseberry, calamondin, (winter) garlic, salvia, fava beans, cauliflower, rucola, zucchini and FAMOUS asparagus.
3.jpg
IMG_0181.JPG
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
Heith
Sodalis
Posts: 2509
Joined: Fri May 31, 2013 12:54 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Heith » Sun Jul 30, 2017 11:16 am

Thank you for sharing Otava, that looks so great! I've been happily following the journey of the famous asparagus for a while now, and am so glad to see your patient waiting and work is paying off!
User avatar
Mimesis
Frater
Posts: 351
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2014 12:32 pm

Re: Gardening

Postby Mimesis » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:16 pm

Brother Otava; I too wanted to express my gratitude in sharing these photographs. It is so very nice to see, and although they may only be photographs, I can see your dedication, enthusiasm and commitment within them, very clearly.

It is nice to be able to relate an actual image of the small amount we have discussed on the matter : )
"We are such stuff. As dreams are made on, and our little life. Is rounded with a sleep."

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest