What are you listening to at the moment?

Visual arts, music, poetry and other forms of art.
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Rúnatýr
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Polyhymnia wrote: Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:28 pm
Rúnatýr wrote: Tue Oct 20, 2020 3:20 pm I'm listening to Enslaved's Axioma Ethica Odini after a long time. I really liked this when it came out a decade or so ago.
Have you heard the latest offering? I think it’s excellent and have been spending a lot of time listening to it these past couple of weeks.
I haven't heard the latest one, and come to think of it, I haven't heard anything from them since Axioma. I'm really bad at following even my favorite bands.
Ing was first amidst the East Danes so seen, until he went eastward over the sea. His wagon ran after. Thus the Heardings named that hero.
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Polyhymnia
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Smaragd wrote: Sat Oct 31, 2020 12:54 am
First thing that came to mind from yodeling is joiku. It's rather from Lappland than from Finland per se and in my understanding traditional to Sami culture.
In this example we have video footage that fittingly associates in my mind to what that sort of easy going lapsteel country music would look like if it would be morphed in the cultural surroundings of rural Finland.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oATnp8VL3qI
The thing that surprised me the most is that the Lion's club is international, hahaha! It's just something I never really thought about. I just thought it was something elderly people were involved in, since I associate it with my grandparents, and didn't realize it would be in Finland as well. This video was so interesting, thank you for sharing! I'm going to search for more joiku. Sami is the indigenous from Norway, right? Does that extend to Finland as well?

Let me know if you find anything really cool in the lap steel department!
"Limited love asks for possession of the beloved, but the unlimited asks only for itself." -Kahlil Gibran
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Polyhymnia wrote: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:28 pm
The thing that surprised me the most is that the Lion's club is international, hahaha! It's just something I never really thought about. I just thought it was something elderly people were involved in, since I associate it with my grandparents, and didn't realize it would be in Finland as well.
If I've understood correctly, Lions, Rotary etc. are humanitarian off-shoots of Freemasonry.
Ing was first amidst the East Danes so seen, until he went eastward over the sea. His wagon ran after. Thus the Heardings named that hero.
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Polyhymnia wrote: Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:28 pm Sami is the indigenous from Norway, right? Does that extend to Finland as well?
Their cultural region Sápmi encompass areas of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. I once saw a documentary of a Skolt Sámi story teller who had lived as a refugee near my childhood home town. The myths of the documentary, collected by a German a documentarist, were quite loose and out there. She, the story teller, herself referred to them as lies and felt they are both going to answer the consequences for making them public. But I really enjoyed the way the documentary portrays the story teller incorporating singing in her daily life. I often think of it as an ideal way for music; not so much listening to it from records, as a spell like part of every day life that is closer to acknowledging things than manipulating them, and thus opening rather straight relationship between things. One can make ones own songs, but it can also be a part of oral tradition. The documentary is called Kaisa's Enchanted Forest. The director, a descendant of the story teller, has collected the material left from the German documentarist and made her own whole of it, that I could not help thinking continued the misfortune the story teller thought the material had in it.
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Polyhymnia
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Rúnatýr wrote: Sun Nov 01, 2020 10:09 pm If I've understood correctly, Lions, Rotary etc. are humanitarian off-shoots of Freemasonry.
I KNEW IT!! That was the first thought I had when I saw it was a global organization, haha!
"Limited love asks for possession of the beloved, but the unlimited asks only for itself." -Kahlil Gibran
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Polyhymnia
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Smaragd wrote: Sun Nov 01, 2020 10:56 pm Their cultural region Sápmi encompass areas of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. I once saw a documentary of a Skolt Sámi story teller who had lived as a refugee near my childhood home town. The myths of the documentary, collected by a German a documentarist, were quite loose and out there. She, the story teller, herself referred to them as lies and felt they are both going to answer the consequences for making them public. But I really enjoyed the way the documentary portrays the story teller incorporating singing in her daily life. I often think of it as an ideal way for music; not so much listening to it from records, as a spell like part of every day life that is closer to acknowledging things than manipulating them, and thus opening rather straight relationship between things. One can make ones own songs, but it can also be a part of oral tradition. The documentary is called Kaisa's Enchanted Forest. The director, a descendant of the story teller, has collected the material left from the German documentarist and made her own whole of it, that I could not help thinking continued the misfortune the story teller thought the material had in it.
Ah, thanks for clearing that up for me! This documentary sounds very interesting, and I'm going to try and find it. I'm very fascinated by oral traditions, and I, too, think it's ideal to incorporate song into daily life.
"as a spell like part of every day life that is closer to acknowledging things than manipulating them"
I really like that description
"Limited love asks for possession of the beloved, but the unlimited asks only for itself." -Kahlil Gibran
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Smaragd wrote: Sun Nov 01, 2020 10:56 pm She, the story teller, herself referred to them as lies and felt they are both going to answer the consequences for making them public. But I really enjoyed the way the documentary portrays the story teller incorporating singing in her daily life. I often think of it as an ideal way for music; not so much listening to it from records, as a spell like part of every day life that is closer to acknowledging things than manipulating them, and thus opening rather straight relationship between things. One can make ones own songs, but it can also be a part of oral tradition.
Very smallish note; I think rock musicians who claim that they "steal" riffs from others is actually not a way to portrait it in my opinion. Of course if one wants to see music and certain things as "their own property" then maybe yes.
The other point of view is to look at rock tradition, whether it's oral or recorded tradition and claim that musician is taking it from tradition while being actually a member of said tradition. Actually there is multiple different point of views to look at it. :)

Of course this is could be seen in LHP and RHP manner as well, but from my point of view emphasizing too much on individual can cause the satanic friction that is necessary but by looking things through some kind of tradition you are actually free to use existing material and develop your own style. This in fact is very close to what scientific research is or can be about. To take different elements and material, compare them together, do research and form at the end synthesis and your final conclusions based on that.

Then again if you are leaning too much on tradition one might end up just repeating it. Which is completely fine, from dharmic and pragmatic point of view in arts and in occult we might need all kinds of people. Those who invent new things and those who research those things that existed before and those who preserve it.
I still struggle with finding right path but you could say that if it feels like there is no road, you are making one. Although this road might be at swamp and I drown.



Music, any music works the best in live performances. Recordings and videos are for enjoyment, but in live performance elemental spirits which in recordings are molded and frozen actually become "alive" in live performance. :lol:
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Kavi wrote: Mon Nov 02, 2020 12:24 pm Music, any music works the best in live performances. Recordings and videos are for enjoyment, but in live performance elemental spirits which in recordings are molded and frozen actually become "alive" in live performance. :lol:
This I strongly disagree. I rarely like to watch/listen bands in live settings. I think music is best listened alone on a right mindset. For example Mortiis listened/played in live is awful idea. And (Old) Mortiis listened alone in a right mindset is bliss. Different genres work differently in live. Some rock/punk/trash metal/"party music" played live works, but ambient and black metal should be almost banned to play live.
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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Kenazis wrote: Tue Nov 03, 2020 12:26 pm
Kavi wrote: Mon Nov 02, 2020 12:24 pm Music, any music works the best in live performances. Recordings and videos are for enjoyment, but in live performance elemental spirits which in recordings are molded and frozen actually become "alive" in live performance. :lol:
This I strongly disagree. I rarely like to watch/listen bands in live settings. I think music is best listened alone on a right mindset. For example Mortiis listened/played in live is awful idea. And (Old) Mortiis listened alone in a right mindset is bliss. Different genres work differently in live. Some rock/punk/trash metal/"party music" played live works, but ambient and black metal should be almost banned to play live.
This is interesting outlook!
I'd want to add that I myself like small venues (even homes) and especially acoustic music which creates very pleasant atmosphere.

But I would want to agree that it certainly depends on music and maybe I made too broad generalizations which I often do. I rarely go to see any metal music live nowadays. It feels like it's created for the recordings or audio file first and to be played live second.
I went once to see Swans and I hoped the live performance would have similar effect as their records but I got quite bored standing there.

I would like to hear more argumentation and thoughts about strong disagreement if you have motivation to share some of them?
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Polyhymnia
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Re: What are you listening to at the moment?

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I very much love live performances as well, as long as the intent is there to make it a meaningful and soulful experience. I definitely think that spiritual feeling, that bliss, can be achieved with a piece of music in any format, and at any time, but for me there's something about watching a musician perform that sets my soul on fire. I like to watch their facial expressions, the way their bodies move. If the heart isn't in it though, and they're really just performing for the sake of they have to, or they can't wait to get it over with, I'm not into it.
"Limited love asks for possession of the beloved, but the unlimited asks only for itself." -Kahlil Gibran
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